Please, Stop with the “OMG”

For those of you who have managed to live blissfully in a cave (is there room for me?), OMG is the popularly used net-centric abbreviation for “Oh my, God.” “OMG” is everywhere—even available now in a polyester bedspread and coordinating teenage girl décor. I’ve got problems with “OMG,” but mainly because it seems like man chose which parts of the Bible are “applicable to today.” As if when God said, “Do not take my name in vain,” He was leaving much open to debate.  I get almost irate when thinking about how far down the slippery slope our society has fallen. Moral decay is lavishly celebrated (Romans 1:32) and society denounces anyone or anything that mirrors an accurate image of our Savior. I find peace when I realize God surely doesn’t need me to be offended for Him.  He is our creator, the all-knowing, all-powerful, omnipotent God and He has never needed me to “get mad” about anything for Him.  The only thing He has actually ever asked of us was to follow His commands (John 14:15) and to “Love one another,” (John 13:34).

Since there is no need to be upset for God, I wish to passionately plea and pray for the souls of our society. In today’s Christianity, we’ve watered-down Christ into an easily tolerated fizz. We embrace the “lamb” side of Jesus (Jesus welcoming children and healing ailments), but conveniently forget the “lion” (Jesus flipping tables because of sin in the synagogues). We believe that because we’ve attended church on the big holidays, we can check the “Christian box” on our social resume and move about daily life unchanged. God is so much bigger than that! Being a follower of Christ is more than just a Sunday occurrence. Following God’s only Son is an everyday, every moment longing to live life praising Him. Do we fall significantly short of this? Absolutely (Romans 3:23).  Many of us know we will fall short, and since it would be difficult or against our current desires (i.e. to give up and repent for the sin in our lives) we make the conscious decision not to go all in with Jesus. However, since we know we will fail, it does not mean we should not strive to live better, holier lives (Romans 6:1-2). I can relate the right course of action (turning from sin/repentance) to athletes who know they will likely lose or fall short of a goal, but they still strive on through honorable competition.

At the end of my life, I know I will have lost the race against time. I will have fallen in the battle with age, and I will not be able to outlast the limited beats of my heart. And though I cannot win or on this Earth against my fleshly desires (Matthew 26:41), I celebrate the victory of our Savior who defeated death on a cross (1 Corinthians 15:57). My efforts are worth little, yet my faith is worth everything. May in Glory we all stand together and hear the words of our greatest champion, “Well done, my good and faithful servant,” (Matthew 25:21).

Referenced Verses:

  • Although they know full well God’s just sentence–that those who practice such things deserve to die–they not only do them, but even applaud others who practice them.
    Romans 1:32 HCSB
  • “A new command I [Jesus] give you: Love one another.  As I have loved you, so you must love one another.” John 13:34 NIV
  • For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. Romans 3:23 HCSB
  • What shall we say, then? Shall we go on sinning so that grace may increase? By no means! We are those who have died to sin; how can we live in it any longer? Romans 6:1-2 NIV
  • “Watch and pray so that you will not fall into temptation. The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak.” Matthew 26:41
  • But thank God! He gives us victory over sin and death through our Lord Jesus Christ. 1 Corinthians 15:57 NLT
  • “His master replied, ‘Well done, good and faithful servant! You have been faithful with a few things; I will put you in charge of many things. Come and share your master’s happiness!’ Matthew 25:21 NIV

 

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